April 26, 2021

Celebrating Spring

A beautiful spring salad

The season commenced with the first celebratory crunchy bite of radish. Radish, and much of the other spring crops, are still making a gentle emergence but there’s plenty on the way. As we’ve begun thinning our beds of Arugula we had the pleasure of enjoying the thinned greens in a big salad over the weekend. I almost like these tiny sprigs better than the bigger ones we’ll see later in the season. However, the balance between earthy green and arugula’s signature spice makes me very excited for the harvests ahead. Topped with violets, this salad was a showpiece for spring’s beauty and abundance.

A few weeks ago we harvested wild violets and made a batch of violet vinegar by pouring white vinegar over the violets and leaving them in a jar. It was the perfect ingredient for a homemade vinaigrette to go with the salad.

Making it through the last week of frosty nights made me glad we held out on transplanting our more delicate crops. The week ahead looks warm and beautiful and we’re hopeful to get our already-blooming tomatoes into the ground, more direct-sow crops planted, squashes potted up, and to start working on more farm infrastructure projects that we’ll share on the blog in the future.

We hope each of you have a beautiful and nourishing week.

-Ruth & Matt

Featured Recipe

Wild Violet Vinaigrette

This simple vinaigrette is made using a homemade batch of violet vinegar. It's light and a perfect pairing to a salad full of spring greens, radishes, herbs, carrots, and green onions.

Ingredients:

  • • 1/4 cup violet vinegar
  • • 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • • 1 garlic clove, pressed/minced
  • • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • • 1/4 tsp salt
  • • 1T local honey

Instructions:

Combine all of the above ingredients in a pint jar with lid. Shake until fully combined. Keep refrigerated; serve at room temperature. To make violet vinegar - In a pint jar collect wild violets from your yard or other abundant source that has not been harmed by chemicals or other toxins. Take only some of what is available, leaving plenty for others (wildlife, soil organisms, the beauty of their presence, etc.). Fill the jar about half way. Pour distilled white vinegar over the blooms, cover with a lid, and leave in a cool dark space. Gently shake the jar once a day. Leave for 2 or 3 weeks or 1 full moon cycle if desired.